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mountain cabin in the u.s., the latest twist in the hunt for a former police officer accused of murder. pope benedict xvi has given his first weekly general audience since he shocked the world by becoming the first pontiff in six centuries to step down. he received a long standing ovation as he made its way into the audience hall at the vatican? . later he will preside over an ash wednesday mass. will go to our correspondent at the vatican. he said that he is stepping down for the good of the church. >> absolutely. the pope went straight into it. his first words were that he has taken the decision in full freedom and for the good of the church. he went on explaining that he understood the gravity of the moment. then he came to the realization that he did not have the spiritual or the material's strength to carry out his ministry. it was a standing ovation for the pope. it was a very festive atmosphere in the auditorium. 8000 people were there singing before he arrived. there was music. the vatican also want to show this is not a dramatic moments, this is a difficult moment for the chur
they use. households in such simple economies are almost completely self-sufficient. at the other end of the spectrum are highly complex economies in which people specialize in one particular job, like these shoe salesmen in morocco. specialization means people are no longer self-sufficient, but depend on each other. the shoe salesmen are dependent on the shoemakers, and the shoemakers are dependent on the tanners, and so on. this dependence on others makes society in general more complex, so specialization is a measure of society's overall complexity. archaeologists find evidence of specialization everywhere -- in the buildings and sculpture of ancient cities, and in crafts like elegant jade earrings, decorated pottery and even skulls with jade inlays in their teeth. these craft items were all made by specialists who worked at the ancient maya city of copan. between a.d. 400 and 800, this magnificent city flourished as one of the major centers of maya art and culture. copan was built in a broad mountain valley on the western border of honduras. at its height, the economic system of t
/3 of the chamber had been elected illegally. u.s. officials say radioactive waste is leaking from six under grow storage tanks in the state of washington. the tanks are about 8 kilometers from the columbia river. officials say there is no immediate threat to public health. the former nuclear weapons production complex is america's most contaminated nuclear sites. the u.s. is spending billions in an effort to manage thousands of tons of nuclear waste. in mali, at least 70 people were killed in clashes between rebels and soldiers. at least 13 troops were killed along with 65 rebels. the fighting raged in the northern part of the country near the algerian border. over the last month, the militants have been driven into the desert and mountains by french and african soldiers. france says it wants to start withdrawing its troops next month. are american troops leaving afghanistan at the end of 2014 or not? that dispute came up on friday. german and to the german defense minister told reporters at least 8000 u.s. soldiers will stay in afghanistan after 2014. washington says it is still weighing its op
got a hero's welcome visiting timbuktu. jackie is in timbuktu for us. not quite mission accomplished but it seems like hollande was welcomed, indeed. >> yes. francois hollande saw this as a mission of three stages to prevent the rebels from continuing their advance south, to recapture towns taken by the rebels and restore territorial integrity sovereignty to mali. the third part of the mission will take much longer. let's take a look at the president's day in tim puck to - timbuktu. he sent french troops to mali three weeks ago and now has come to congratulate them. the rebel advance has been halted and french and malian troops have recaptured towns in the north and east of the country. francois hollande has come to thank french troops for what he sees as their successful work in mali but the mission will not be complete until the whole of the country is under central control and that's not the case. the president heads for the center and a rapturous welcome. people are grateful to the french for ridding the city of al qaeda-linked rebels and want to thank hollande personally. then i
disturbed by it. it came during hagel hearings and was politically calibrated to get the support of the u.s. senate. what can a president say? he is not going to denounce israel now? i am very suspicious of the motives of the attack. >> israel maintained the lorries they were attacking carried game changing weapons. does that make it all right? is anyone likely to criticize israel for taking this position? >> there is a lot of criticism from the middle east, and that can be expected. we have only israel's word to go on. i have seen no independent evidence to confirm what they claimed. i am sure from their perspective these surface air missiles they said they were interdicting might be a game changer, but they are only a game changer if israel is planning an attack on has the law or lebanon or further attacks on syria. -- on hezbollah or lebanon or further attacks on syria. >> he does not want another front, does he? >> i am not sure he has enough to strike back with. certainly under international law he would be in his legitimate rights to strike back. i do not think of is going to happen.
the potential to carry out tests using a method that would make a nuclear weapon extremely effective. >> in the past, the nuclear bombs dropped on hiroshima and nagasaki were made of plutonium. weighed 13 tons and it resulted in a huge number of casualties. we believe the advanced weapons from the north might have several times more impact and could almost destroy an entire city. >> a new report by doctors without borders says half of the 220,000 syrian deputies in lebanon are not receiving adequate medical care. it says the situation has deteriorated over the last six months. now this live report from club anon. they were meant to be refugee camps, but are they providing any real refuge for the syrians escaping the fighting? >> the report says, basically, that the refugees are living in subhuman conditions. they don't have adequate shelter or access to medical care. we are the valid at one of the u.n. centers where the refugees come to register their names. it's a very important process. you can see them lining up. they come with their whole family and each member of the family has
with us. here's a look at what is coming up today -- italy. a trip to a prison island. russia -- the desperate life of many orphans. france -- how architects want to improve life in the suburbs. first, to turkey and its relationship with religious minorities. some are officially recognized in turkey. jews, a greek orthodox, and armenian christians. the turkish government has made concessions to christian minorities, such as returning property confiscated a long time ago. churches, for example. that has given armenians in turkey in fresh confidence boost, but their situation remains difficult. ankara still refuses to recognize the genocide of armenians under ottoman rule 100 years ago. officially, there are some 60,000 armenians in turkey, but the numbers could be rising. in some parts of turkey, descendants of armenians are now rediscovering their identity. >> home to a population of more than 1 million, the city is situated on the turkey -- turkish/i iraqi border. it is the unofficial capital of turkey. but it was not always. between the many minuets that make up the skyline
of the millennium was the release. we see a dramatic revival in the use of monumental sculpture and large-scale architecture such as had only been glimpsed in the previous centuries. the cult of saints and the passion for pilgrimage to their shrines were dominant features of medieval culture. one of the most famous was the pilgrimage to santiago in spain. the church was believed to house a sacred rel of christendom-- the bones of saint james, santiago in spanish, one of christ's 12 apostles. from atop the tower at vezelay, you can still make out the old way of saint james, winding its way to spain. it's astonishing to think that hundreds of thousands of men and women made that pilgrimage during the medieval period. they undertook such arduous journeys for a multitude of reasons-- to plead for divine help, to ask for the cure of illness, to give thanks, to ask for penance. but above all they went for the salvation of their souls. to achieve the state of grace conferred by his relics, they traveled great distances on foot... by boat... on horseback... wearinge pical pilgrim'- the hat, the s
. >> it is a business with the future and perhaps it will bring more inhabitants. there used to be 600 islanders here. they made a living fishing and farming, but life was harsh. many young islanders dreamt of a better future and left for the united states, australia, for canada. >> the island always had a high regard for education. basically, when you reach the age of 12, you were sent to be educated. it was a waste of your education if you did not go to college or university or whatever it might have been. then, once you went to college or university, it was a waste of your degree or whatever qualification you had it if you did not put it to good use. >> he is considering inviting foreigners to the island. >> if you look at the population of india and china, there's an awful lot of people being born every day. there is room here. i think people will drift in this direction. the island is not prejudiced. in fact, i think they could not care less as long as people come in. that is what you need. >> his idea is simple -- anyone who does not want to work with sheep can collect seaweed instead. it is wi
. but that is not really what the figures are showing us because he still lost millions of votes compared to last time that italy went to the polls. the country is divided into four -- a quarter did not vote, according voted for -- and then a quarter to the center right and left. half the country, -- rejected conventional politics. that is what a lot of the grillo voters wanted. they did not want to see the same people in parliament or a continuation of the dysfunctional and corrupt scandal-ridden politics and they have been getting used to the last few decades. i think the politicians may try to find some kind of interim government solution to see italy through to the next elections, but if you actually look at the vote and grillo's protest vote, that is not what the country wants. a lot of supporters say it is not just a protest vote, we want change. and they think he is the best way to achieve that. >> the financial markets have reacted nervously to this inconclusive result. what are the implications of it for the italian, it -- economy and the eurozone? but they are huge. we have already seen the
a native hut oa plantation. below us, the sea and a sandy beach for bathing and on either side coconut palms and other fruit trees for a landscape painter to feast on... what appeals to me most is the people, and every day brings a ceaseless coming and going of island women in colorful fad finery with their infinite variety of graceful movements. narrator: gauguin returned to paris late in 1887 and sold some of his martinique paintings. the perceptive critic octave mirbeau was spellbound. ra sacred, eden-like abundance in these forest interiorstery, with their monstrous vegetation and flowers and their tremendous sunsets. narrator: gauguin returned to brittany in 1888. two years earlier he had left as an observer. he returned as a prophet. reader (gauguin): i love brittany. here i find wild and primitive features. when my wooden clogs resound on this granite ground, i hear the muffled and powerful thud that i seek in my painting. when my wooden clogs resound on this granite ground, naator: finding pont-aven too touristy, he took lodgings in le pouldu, a fishing village on the atlantic
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11